Tag: Facebook

Game Trains Police To Get Facebook Data Fast

When a terrorist strikes, getting information fast from a tech giant can make the difference between police catching the suspects, or another attack taking place. That’s the premise of a new game created by Europol, the European body responsible for connecting the continent’s myriad policing agencies and helping them investigate major crimes.

Right now, police officers are often confused by the process. What data can they request from which provider? Can they retrieve any encrypted content from the likes of Apple or WhatsApp? What legal mechanisms should they be using? What’s the best language to use to ensure they get the information they want quickly?

Cope want data, from Facebook to TikTok

The game, exclusively shown to Forbes ahead of its release to law enforcement partners and their 4,500 officers on Wednesday, hopes to make sure police know the answers to those when an emergency happens. It looks much like

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Why Google and Facebook Could Dominate Big Data

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The Facebook logo is seen on a phone


Alastair Pike /AFP via Getty Images

Data has become big business, and is in many ways at the heart of big tech’s recent rise. Bernstein argues that those companies with the best ability to monetize the value of data will be the winners.

Analyst Matti Littunen takes a look at the world of data collection and aggregation, noting that consumer personal data generates more than $50 billion in annual revenues just in data broker and marketing data services. Media spending driven by the data amounts to an additional $100 billion.

Yet data is just another form of noise if it’s not utilized correctly. As a result, Littunen says, there will be a “further value shift in the consumer data supply chain from data extraction and identity profiling to analytics and activation software. Data assets are valuable to the extent they

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Right-wing disinformation campaigns are targeting Latinos in Spanish Facebook and WhatsApp groups



Mark Zuckerberg wearing a suit and tie: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images


© The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images

  • Largely right-wing campaigns are spreading misinformation regarding democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden and his running mate Kamala Harris online, per a report in MIT Technology Review.
  • Spanish-language Facebook and WhatsApp group users have reported seeing messages like “Biden = Socialism” and that Kamala Harris supports abortions “minutes before birth,” both of which are untrue. 
  • Joe Biden’s success among Latino voters in swing states greatly impacts his chance of winning the election.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Latinos — a voting bloc that could decide the 2020 election — are getting hit with false information on Spanish-language Facebook and WhatsApp groups.

Largely right-wing disinformation campaigns, or ads that spread false or exaggerated information, are targeting Hispanic-Americans online, the MIT Technology Review Reported. Users reported seeing repetitive messaging of Kamala Harris supporting

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Snap Taps Facebook, Google Alum Alexa Levine as U.S. Head of Entertainment Sales

Snap, parent company of Snapchat, has hired Alexa Levine as U.S. head of entertainment.

Levine comes to Snap from Facebook, where she worked for three years oversaw the company’s film, TV, streaming and live event ad clients as industry manager for entertainment. Prior to joining Facebook in 2017, she had a variety of roles at Google — including, most recently, senior account executive, media and entertainment — as well as Microsoft and ad agency Omnicom.

At Snap, Levine is responsible for leading the company’s entertainment sales team and working with U.S. entertainment clients advertising on the platform. Based in Los Angeles. Levine reports to Clayton Peters, U.S. head of verticals, who oversees Snap’s enterprise verticals.

Levine holds a bachelor’s degree in business and hotel management from Cornell University and an MBA from the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan.

Snap continues to bulk up its originals slate

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Facebook donates $1.3 million to boost WWII code-breaking site

Facebook has made a £1 million ($1.3 million) donation to the museum at Bletchley Park, where British code-breakers decrypted messages sent using Nazi Germany’s Enigma cipher and contributed to an Allied victory in World War II, after the site was forced to cut dozens of jobs as a result of the pandemic.



a person standing in front of a store: UNITED KINGDOM - OCTOBER 23: Colossus was the world's first electronic programmable computer at Bletchley Park in Buckinghamshire. Bletchley Park was the British forces' intelligence centre during WWII, and is where cryptographers deciphered top-secret military communiques between Hitler and his armed forces. The communiques were encrypted in the Lorenz code which the Germans considered unbreakable, but the codebreakers at Bletchley cracked the code with the help of Colossus, and so aided the Allies' victory. The women seen here belonged to the Women's Royal Naval Service, (WRNS) and were nicknamed �Wrens�. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)


© Bletchley Park Trust/SSPL/Getty Images
UNITED KINGDOM – OCTOBER 23: Colossus was the world’s first electronic programmable computer at Bletchley Park in Buckinghamshire. Bletchley Park was the British forces’ intelligence centre during WWII, and is where cryptographers deciphered top-secret military communiques between Hitler and his armed forces. The communiques were encrypted in the Lorenz code which the Germans considered unbreakable, but the codebreakers at Bletchley cracked the code with the help of Colossus, and so aided the Allies’ victory. The women seen here belonged to the Women’s Royal Naval Service, (WRNS) and were nicknamed �Wrens�. (Photo by SSPL/Getty

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Facebook updates hate speech policy to ban Holocaust denial

Oct. 12 (UPI) — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said Monday that the company will update its hate speech policy to ban Holocaust denial.

Zuckerberg made the announcement in a Facebook post.

“We’ve taken down posts that praise hate crimes or mass murder, including the Holocaust. But with rising anti-Semitism, we’re expanding our policy to prohibit any content that denies or distorts the Holocaust as well,” the post read. “If people search for the Holocaust on Facebook, we’ll start directing you to authoritative sources to get accurate information.”

The update reverses Facebook’s earlier policy on the issue.

In 2018, Zuckerberg said in a Recode Decode podcast interview that the social media company does not want to ban Holocaust denial posts because people should be able to make unintentional mistakes.

“I don’t think they’re intentionally getting it wrong,” Zuckerberg said on the podcast at the time.

Facebook Vice President of Content Policy

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Facebook Has Finally Banned Holocaust Denial. Critics Ask What Took Them So Long

Children liberated from Auschwitz in World War II, 1945
Children liberated from Auschwitz in World War II, 1945

Children photographed inside the Auschwitz concentration camp on January 27, 1945. Credit – TASS via Getty Images

Facebook updated its rules on Monday to explicitly ban any content that “denies or distorts” the Holocaust, after years of allowing people to deny that the genocide occurred.

The move reverses Facebook’s previous stance, which was articulated by CEO Mark Zuckerberg in years of interviews as not wanting his company to be an arbiter of truth.

“I’m Jewish, and there’s a set of people who deny that the Holocaust happened. I find that deeply offensive. But at the end of the day, I don’t believe that our platform should take that down because I think there are things that different people get wrong,” he told Vox’s Recode in 2018.

Zuckerberg’s position, and Facebook’s, has “evolved” since then, he said in a Facebook post published

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Facebook bans Holocaust-denial content after allowing it for years

  • Facebook announced Monday it was changing its hate speech policy to “prohibit any content that denies or distorts the Holocaust.”
  • The company has faced criticism for more than a decade over its refusal to moderate anti-Semitic content that distorts or denies the Holocaust, when Nazis and their allies systematically killed 6 million Jews, happened.
  • In the weeks leading up to the 2020 presidential election, Facebook has attempted to mitigate criticism that it fails to prevent the spread of dangerous conspiracy theories and disinformation on its platform. Just last week, Facebook said it banned QAnon accounts across its platforms.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Facebook has banned Holocaust-denial content from the platform after years of criticism over its refusal to take action against such anti-Semitic rhetoric.

Facebook announced Monday it was updating its hate speech policy to “prohibit any content that denies or distorts the Holocaust.”

The policy change

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Facebook Decides Holocaust Denial Content Is Bad, Actually

Facebook has, for years, intentionally looked the other way when users shared content that denied or distorted the Holocaust.

That may finally be changing.

Facebook’s vice president of content policy, Monika Bickert, said Monday the company is updating its hate speech policy to prohibit Holocaust denials and distortions. 

A “well-documented rise in anti-Semitism globally and the alarming level of ignorance about the Holocaust, especially among young people,” Bickert said, prompted the long-overdue change.

The announcement makes no mention of how Facebook itself contributed to that anti-Semitic rise. The social media platform has become a clearinghouse for misinformation concerning virtually every subject, including Holocaust denials and anti-Semitism in general.

It’s unclear how Facebook intends to enforce the expanded policy, or how it will define content that violates it.

“Enforcement of these policies cannot happen overnight,” Bickert acknowledged in the announcement. “There is a range of content that can violate these policies,

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Facebook reverses policy and bans Holocaust denial on its platforms

Facebook has announced a ban on content that denies or distorts the Holocaust. The policy marks a reversal on how to handle a disturbing category of posts that CEO Mark Zuckerberg once said should not be blocked on the platform even though they’re false. 

The company updated its hate speech policy to prohibit such content, Monika Bickert, VP of Content Policy at Facebook, said in a statement on Monday. 

“Our decision is supported by the well-documented rise in anti-Semitism globally and the alarming level of ignorance about the Holocaust, especially among young people,” she said.

Groups that track hate speech “are reporting increases in online attacks against many groups worldwide, and we continue our efforts to remove it,” Bickert said. 

The company says it removed 22.5 million pieces of hate speech shared on its platform in the second quarter of this year alone. Facebook has also banned more than 250

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