Category: COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY

This EdTech Founder Is Making Sure Every Kid Has Access To A Computer

As the co-founder and chief marketing officer of edtech startup Tanoshi, a company that makes affordable laptops for kids, Lisa Love is working hard to make sure all children—especially those from underrepresented communities—have the technology they need to succeed.

Love spent most of her career as a corporate marketing strategist for brands like Heinz and Del Monte before striking out on her own as an entrepreneur.

“Being an entrepreneur is in your blood,” she says. “You either love taking the risks and going on that roller coaster ride, or you like a corporate position, working for other people and having that stability. I knew early on that I wanted to own my own business.”

After grad school at Clark Atlanta, Love planned to give corporate life 10 years. “But 10 years turned out to be 15 years and then 20 years and at some point I’m just like, OK, I’m

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Sarasota partnership brings technology, training to clients in need

Emily Wunderlich
 |  Sarasota Herald-Tribune

At 71, Cat Christensen didn’t grow up around computers. 

After retiring as a social worker in 2006, she recently decided she needed to reenter the workforce in order to keep up with demanding medical expenses. 

But when her computer “self-destructed” four months ago – just as the coronavirus pandemic was reaching a crescendo – she found herself with no way to apply for jobs or financial assistance, much less stay connected with loved ones around the country.

More: Read more stories about digital access in Sarasota-Manatee

Christensen was one of 10 women who got to participate in the pilot launch of “Tech to Connect,” a partnership between the Women’s Resource Center and Goodwill Manasota that provided laptops to clients after they completed digital literacy training.

“I learned some new things to make me more competitive with the younger people that knew these things before I

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Elon Musk Unveils Brain Computer Implanted in Pigs

(Bloomberg) — Just when you thought the year 2020 couldn’t get much weirder, billionaire Elon Musk has introduced a group of pigs with mind-reading brain implants. 



Elon Musk sitting on a stage: Elon Musk, founder of SpaceX and chief executive officer of Tesla Inc., speaks during a discussion at the Satellite 2020 Conference in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, March 9, 2020. The event comprises important topics facing both satellite industry and end-users, and brings together a diverse group of thought leaders to share their knowledge.


© Bloomberg
Elon Musk, founder of SpaceX and chief executive officer of Tesla Inc., speaks during a discussion at the Satellite 2020 Conference in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, March 9, 2020. The event comprises important topics facing both satellite industry and end-users, and brings together a diverse group of thought leaders to share their knowledge.

During an event Friday afternoon at Neuralink’s headquarters in Fremont, California, Musk found himself hanging out with a passel of Yucatan swine. Several of them had previously undergone a surgical procedure in which a robot placed the latest version of Neuralink’s computing implant into their brains. As a result, the brain activity of these enhanced porkers could be transmitted wirelessly to a nearby computer, allowing onlookers at the

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Google conducts largest chemical simulation on a quantum computer to date

Google conducts largest chemical simulation on a quantum computer to date
Google’s Sycamore processor mounted in a cryostat, recently used to demonstrate quantum supremacy and the largest quantum chemistry simulation on a quantum computer. Credit: Rocco Ceselin

A team of researchers with Google’s AI Quantum team (working with unspecified collaborators) has conducted the largest chemical simulation on a quantum computer to date. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their work and why they believe it was a step forward in quantum computing. Xiao Yuan of Stanford University has written a Perspective piece outlining the potential benefits of quantum computer use to conduct chemical simulations and the work by the team at AI Quantum, published in the same journal issue.


Developing an ability to predict chemical processes by simulating them on computers would be of great benefit to chemists—currently, they do most of it through trial and error. Prediction would open up the door to the

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IBM’s Customers Show Us Why It’s Important To Build A Quantum Computing Strategy Today

Technology moves fast. Scientists are already developing the next generation of computing called quantum computing. Over the past year, I’ve had the opportunity to speak several times with Bob Sutor,  VP of IBM’s Quantum Ecosystem Development, on what was happening in the field. While quantum computing isn’t a household term, Sutor shared that it isn’t new. Quantum computing’s roots extend back to the 1900s and quantum mechanics.

Quantum computing uses quantum mechanics concepts such as superposition, entanglement and interference. Yet, these terms are confusing for individuals not deeply rooted in physics. Rather than try to explain each of these, I suggest watching this video where WIRED challenged Dr. Talia Gershon, Director of Hybrid Cloud Infrastructure Research at IBM Research, to explain quantum computing to 5 different people. Gershon was previously IBM’s Senior Manager of Quantum Research. The video is brilliant. 

Sutor

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Elon Musk demonstrates brain-computer tech Neuralink in live pigs

A pig with a Neuralink implant.

Screengrab of live demo

Elon Musk’s brain-machine interface company, Neuralink, conducted a live demo of its technology on Friday, showing a coin-sized device without wires.

The Tesla and SpaceX CEO brought along three pigs, who had varying levels of interest in cooperating. Eventually, the audience was shown real-time neural signals from one of the pigs, which Musk named Gertrude. According to Musk, Gertrude has had the implant for about two months. 

The start-up, which launched in 2016 and is funded primarily by Musk, said it is designing tiny flexible ‘threads’ that are 10 times thinner than a human hair with the goal of treating brain injuries and trauma, along with someday enabling symbiosis between humans and artificial intelligence. The design has been tested on at least 19 different animals with robots with around an 87% success rate, according to the venture’s presentation last year. 

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