Uber may face big fines for stonewalling on sexual assault data

Uber's San Francisco headquarters. The ride-hailing company has defied California regulators' demands for more information about sexual assault claims made by its customers and drivers. <span class=(Eric Risberg / Associated Press)” src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/Y00_oN6y.dhwGRU20FvCzg–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTcwNTtoPTQzNy4yNjc4NTcxNDI4NTcxNw–/https://media.zenfs.com/en/la_times_articles_853/d9019c57d6694916e4d65575ba33ebd5″ data-src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/Y00_oN6y.dhwGRU20FvCzg–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTcwNTtoPTQzNy4yNjc4NTcxNDI4NTcxNw–/https://media.zenfs.com/en/la_times_articles_853/d9019c57d6694916e4d65575ba33ebd5″/
Uber’s San Francisco headquarters. The ride-hailing company has defied California regulators’ demands for more information about sexual assault claims made by its customers and drivers. (Eric Risberg / Associated Press)

Uber has spent nine months battling California regulators’ demands for detailed information on sexual harassment and assault claims made by its customers and drivers. The company’s favored legal strategy of asking forgiveness rather than permission will face a fresh test Tuesday, when an administrative law judge will hear testimony to decide whether to recommend hefty penalties for its refusal to cooperate with an inquiry by the state’s Public Utilities Commission.

The hearing, scheduled for 1:30 p.m., follows a July 27 ruling upholding the five-person commission’s authority to investigate complaints in order to promote rider safety — authority Uber has allegedly flouted in failing to answer its questions and submit required data.

The

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