Tag: dotcom

Here’s How Much Investing $1,000 In The 5 Biggest Dot-Com Bubble Tech Stocks Would Be Worth Today

Despite an ongoing pandemic and the U.S. economy barely limping along, the Nasdaq is still trading more than 50% above its March lows. The surge in tech stocks in 2020 has understandably led investors to draw comparisons to the dot-com bubble in 2000.

The Nasdaq ultimately peaked at 5,048.62 on March 10, 2000. Of course, some dot-com bubble stocks have performed much better than others in the 20 years since the bubble burst.

FANG Stocks Of Dot Com Bubble: Today’s investors are very familiar with the FANG stocks, Facebook, Inc. (NASDAQ: FB), Amazon.com, Inc. (NASDAQ: AMZN), Netflix, Inc. (NASDAQ: NFLX) and Alphabet, Inc. (NASDAQ: GOOGL) (NASDAQ: GOOGL). These four stocks both led the bull market since the 2008 financial crisis and dominate today’s market with their massive market caps.

The dot-com had its own growth of FANG-esque stocks that dominated the tech sector back in 2000:

  • Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ: MSFT)

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Legendary tech investor Bill Gurley says today’s markets remind him of the dot-com bubble



Bill Gurley wearing a suit and tie: Reuters


© Reuters
Reuters

  • Legendary tech investor Bill Gurley told CNBC on Friday that the stock market reminds him of the late ’90s dot-com bubble. 
  • “There is certainly what I would call a highly speculative nature to the markets today, a willingness to take on risks, a willingness to get excited about projects that may be five or 10 years in the future,” the Benchmark partner said. 
  • Other investors like Stanley Druckenmiller have drawn similar conclusions about today’s technology stocks. 

Legendary venture capitalist Bill Gurley told CNBC on Friday that the stock market reminds him of the late-1990s tech trading environment that led to the dot-com bubble.

“There is certainly what I would call a highly speculative nature to the markets today, a willingness to take on risks, a willingness to get excited about projects that may be five or 10 years in the future, that we haven’t seen since the

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The rally in US tech stocks is ‘nothing close’ to the dot-com bubble, DataTrek says

  • US technology stocks have staged a historic rally since the stock market bottomed on March 23.
  • But the outperformance of US tech stocks relative to the S&P 500 in 2020 pales in comparison to the 2000 dot-com bubble, DataTrek said in a note on Wednesday.
  • Instead, the tech rally today is closer to tech rallies seen in 2003 and 2009, according to performance data cited by DataTrek.
  • At best, tech stocks have “enough room to continue to lead,” but at worst will likely be a market performer into year-end, DataTrek said.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The run in US technology stocks since the stock market bottomed on March 23 has often been compared to the 2000 dot-com bubble, but those comparisons are so far unwarranted, according to DataTrek.

The Nasdaq 100, a tech-heavy index, rallied 82% from its March 23 bottom to its September

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Why one stock-market bull thinks it’s ‘pretty absurd’ to compare tech selloff to 2000’s dot-com bust

This isn’t Pets.com 2.0.


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History isn’t repeating itself when it comes to the highflying technology stocks sector, despite a sudden round of jitters following the Nasdaq’s quick tumble into correction territory this month after a breakneck rally off the pandemic-induced March lows, according to one longtime Wall Street bull.

“After a 62% price run-up in technology stocks since the March lows, all it took was a three-day, 11.4% selloff to shake the confidence of investors and incite renewed fears of a severe and prolonged price decline comparable to the dot-com bubble,” said Brian Belski, chief investment strategist at BMO Capital Markets, in a Thursday note.

Read: The only path to a sharply higher stock market ‘is a bubble like the late 1920s and 1990s,’ says analyst who called rally off March lows

Belski said he found the “constant comparisons to the early 2000s pretty absurd given the significant

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Why one stock-market bull thinks it’s ‘pretty absurd’ to compare tech selloff to 2000’s dot-com bust

THE TELL

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History isn’t repeating itself when it comes to the highflying technology stocks sector, despite a sudden round of jitters following the Nasdaq’s quick tumble into correction territory this month after a breakneck rally off the pandemic-induced March lows, according to one longtime Wall Street bull.

“After a 62% price run-up in technology stocks since the March lows, all it took was a three-day, 11.4% selloff to shake the confidence of investors and incite renewed fears of a severe and prolonged price decline comparable to the dot-com bubble,” said Brian Belski, chief investment strategist at BMO Capital Markets, in a Thursday note.

Read: The only path to a sharply higher stock market ‘is a bubble like the late 1920s and 1990s,’ says analyst who called rally off March lows

Belski said he found the “constant comparisons to the early 2000s pretty absurd given the significant

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2 reasons fears of a dot-com style tech bubble are overblown

Mega-cap tech stocks like Apple (AAPL), Amazon (AMZN), Microsoft (MSFT), Facebook (FB), and Tesla (TSLA) (if you consider that a tech stock) have been hammered over the past few days, pulling down the S&P 500 and tech-heavy Nasdaq. 

During late afternoon trading Tuesday, Tesla was down nearly 20% amid news that it won’t be part of the S&P 500. Meanwhile, Facebook was down nearly 4%, Amazon and Microsoft over 4%, and Apple over 5%. And on Tuesday, workplace collaboration app Slack (WORK) saw its stock plummet over 15% in after-hours trading following a disappointing earnings report.

That’s led to rumblings that the market — which has been bounced around by these and other massive tech names — is careening toward a second coming of the dot-com bubble of the late 1990s that came crashing down 20 years ago. That era was best epitomized by Pets.com, which, despite a flashy advertising

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