Tag: discovered

Newly Discovered ‘Extreme’ Alien Planet Is Super Hot At 5,800 Fahrenheit, Researchers Reveal

KEY POINTS

  • CHEOPS has released the results of its observation on alien planet WASP-189b
  • WASP-189b’s orbit is tilted dramatically and orbits its star every 2.7 Earth days
  • WASP-189b has temperatures reaching 5,800 Fahrenheit

The European Space Agency’s Characterizing Exoplanet Satellite (CHEOPS) has recently discovered an alien planet about 1.6 times the size of Jupiter. Aside from having a strange orbit, it is also scorching hot.

WASP-189b, the newly discovered alien planet, was first detected in 2018 and has been recorded to have temperatures reaching 5,800 Fahrenheit — almost as hot as Earth’s outer core and is even hot enough to turn iron into gas, ESA’s study revealed.

Aside from having a size comparable to Jupiter, the exoplanet is also considered a “Hot Jupiter” due to its extremely short orbital period (2.7 Earth days). A Hot Jupiter is a gas planet with a “Jupiter-like” size that orbits very close to its

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New species of cockroach-killing wasps discovered in 25-million-year-old amber

This ensign wasp was trapped in amber 25 million years ago.


George Poinar Jr./Oregon State University

If you hate cockroaches, then you might find some satisfaction in a fascinating piece of ancient insect history that recently came to light. 

Oregon State University entomologist George Poinar Jr. discovered four new species of ensign wasps in 25-million-year-old amber found in the Dominican Republic and Mexico. These cockroach-killing wasps are still around today, and the amber finds offer an intriguing glimpse into their past.

Poinar is the author of a study on the amber-encased wasps published in the paleobiology journal Historical Biology this month.

This is one of four new species of ensign wasp found trapped in 25-million-year-old amber.


George Poinar Jr./Oregon State University

Ensign wasps let their young handle the cockroach-killing duties. Female wasps lay eggs in

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Between relativistic and classical wave regimes, newly discovered memory effect alters the Doppler wave signature

Between relativistic and classical wave regimes, newly discovered memory effect alters the Doppler wave signature
Illustration of memory effects on wave–matter interaction. From Fig. 1, Kozlov et al., DOI: 10.1117/1.AP.2.5.056003

Wave scattering appears practically everywhere in everyday life—from conversations across rooms, to ocean waves breaking on a shore, from colorful sunsets, to radar waves reflecting from aircraft. Scattering phenomena also appear in realms as diverse as quantum mechanics and gravitation. According to Pavel Ginzburg, professor at Tel Aviv University’s School of Electrical Engineering, these phenomena become especially interesting when the waves in question encounter a moving object.


The everyday Doppler effect is familiar—witnessed as the audible shift in pitch that occurs, for example, as a fire engine’s siren approaches, passes, and recedes. The idea that the observed frequency of a wave depends on the relative speed of the source and the observer, a popularized aspect of Einstein’s theory of relativity, entails cosmic implications for the Doppler effect, particularly for light waves. Now, it appears that

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