Tag: dinosaur

Newly found dinosaur fossils shed light on toothless, two-fingered species

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Here’s a look at what the Oksoko avarsan dinosaurs might have looked like way back when.


Michael W. Skrepnick

Newly discovered fossils of a toothless, parrot-like dinosaur species that lived more than 68 million years ago reveal a creature with two fingers on each forearm. That’s one less digit than its close dino relatives had. 

The fossils imply that the dinosaurs may have evolved forelimb adaptations that enabled them to spread during the Late Cretaceous Period, researchers say in a new study published Wednesday in The Royal Society Open Science journal. Paleontologists from the University of Edinburgh found a number of complete skeletons of the new species during a dig in Mongolia’s Gobi Desert. 

The feathered, omnivorous Oksoko avarsan grew to around 6.5 feet (2 meters) long. In addition to two functional digits on each

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Toothless, parrot-like dinosaur thrived 69 million years ago, study finds

Multiple skeletons of the Oksoko avarsan, a feathered omnivorous dinosaur that grew to 2 meters in length, were dug up in the Gobi Desert in Mongolia by researchers from the University of Edinburgh, according to a news statement published Tuesday.

It had a large, toothless beak like modern-day parrots and just two digits on each forearm — one less than its close relatives.

It’s the first time scientists have seen evidence of digit loss among oviraptors, a family of three-fingered dinosaurs.

Evolving to have fewer digits suggests they could also “alter their diets and lifestyles, and enabled them to diversify and multiply,” according to the statement.

The “very complete” juvenile skeletons were found resting together, showing that young Oksoko avarsan roamed in groups, said paleontologist Gregory Funston, a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Edinburgh who led the study.

“But more importantly, its two-fingered hand prompted us to look at

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Latest TSMC 7nm Data Proves Intel And Other Dinosaur Chipmakers Aren’t Even Close To Dying Yet. A Strong Base Of Revenues For TSMC (NYSE:TSM)

Where new school techies and old school dinosaur investors clash heads is on historical versus future success. No story is better represented by that than the still-smoldering battlefield between armchair investors about Intel (INTC) and AMD (AMD). I don’t need to educate most anyone about the scathing response by Wall Street to Intel’s production delay into 7nm. We don’t need a dissection of the stock chart for AMD to comprehend that they are currently priced to rob Intel of massive market share in processors.

I won’t take a stand on that hairy debate, or on other similar discussions that really illustrate the growing divide between “growth” and “value”, though the same nuts and bolts concept I provide with this analysis on TSMC’s (TSM) recent results can be applied to other hardware debates (and maybe one I can elaborate on if there’s enough interest):

  • Traditional servers IBM (IBM), Hewlett Packard Enterprise
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New species of burrowing dinosaur found perfectly preserved in ‘Cretaceous Pompeii’

The fossils date back an estimated 125 million years ago.

The newly found dinosaur species was discovered in the Lujiatun Beds, located in northeast China in the Liaoning Province, in the oldest layers of the famous Yixian Formation which has produced several hundred preserved dinosaur skeletons over the past 20 years.

“The Lujiatun Beds would have been a kind of Cretaceous ‘Pompeii’,” said the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences in an article announcing the discovery.

The newly

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125 million-year-old dinosaur found buried by a volcanic eruption in China

The new species of burrowing dinosaur was discovered in the Lujiatun Beds, the oldest layers of the famous Yixian Formation in northeast China, according to a news release. Scientists believe that they were trapped by a volcanic eruption while resting at the bottom of their burrows.

“These animals were quickly covered by fine sediment while they were still alive or just after their death,” palaeontologist Pascal Godefroit of the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, said.

The two preserved skeletons (A/B and C) of Changmiania liaoningensis. Red arrows indicate gastrolith, or stone clusters.

The scientist said that the effect would be very similar to what happened in Pompeii. The new species was named Changmiania liaoningensis, according to the news release. Changmian means “eternal sleep” in Chinese.

Scientists deduce that the ornithopod lived during the Cretaceous period and that it was a small herbivore that could run very fast, based on the length of its tail and its leg composition. It was about 1.2 meters (about 4 feet)

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Amber fossils offer a window into dinosaur times but pose ethical dilemmas

When it comes to dinosaurs, many of us think of towering skeletons dominating the atriums of the world’s great natural history museums.



The discovery of a dinosaur tail entombed in amber at a market in Myanmar near the Chinese border grabbed headlines in 2016.


© Royal Saskatchewan Museum (RSM/ R.C. McKellar)
The discovery of a dinosaur tail entombed in amber at a market in Myanmar near the Chinese border grabbed headlines in 2016.

But it’s the tiniest fossils that have transformed paleontology over the past five years.

Some of the field’s most extraordinary discoveries have come from amber: A dinosaur tail, parts of primitive birds, insects, lizards and flowers have all been found entombed in globs of 100 million-year-old tree resin.

They offer a tantalizing, three-dimensional look at dinosaur times. The vivid creatures and plants look like they just died yesterday with soft tissue in place and details like skin, coloring, feathers, teeth, leaves and petals exquisitely preserved — details that are often lost in the crush of fossils formed in rock.

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