Facebook donates $1.3 million to boost WWII code-breaking site

Facebook has made a £1 million ($1.3 million) donation to the museum at Bletchley Park, where British code-breakers decrypted messages sent using Nazi Germany’s Enigma cipher and contributed to an Allied victory in World War II, after the site was forced to cut dozens of jobs as a result of the pandemic.



a person standing in front of a store: UNITED KINGDOM - OCTOBER 23: Colossus was the world's first electronic programmable computer at Bletchley Park in Buckinghamshire. Bletchley Park was the British forces' intelligence centre during WWII, and is where cryptographers deciphered top-secret military communiques between Hitler and his armed forces. The communiques were encrypted in the Lorenz code which the Germans considered unbreakable, but the codebreakers at Bletchley cracked the code with the help of Colossus, and so aided the Allies' victory. The women seen here belonged to the Women's Royal Naval Service, (WRNS) and were nicknamed �Wrens�. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)


© Bletchley Park Trust/SSPL/Getty Images
UNITED KINGDOM – OCTOBER 23: Colossus was the world’s first electronic programmable computer at Bletchley Park in Buckinghamshire. Bletchley Park was the British forces’ intelligence centre during WWII, and is where cryptographers deciphered top-secret military communiques between Hitler and his armed forces. The communiques were encrypted in the Lorenz code which the Germans considered unbreakable, but the codebreakers at Bletchley cracked the code with the help of Colossus, and so aided the Allies’ victory. The women seen here belonged to the Women’s Royal Naval Service, (WRNS) and were nicknamed �Wrens�. (Photo by SSPL/Getty

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