Tag: cells

Tesla wants to build battery cells in Texas alongside Cybertrucks

  • Tesla may be planning to build batteries at its forthcoming Texas factory.
  • In documents filed to the state’s Commission on Environmental Quality, the company mentions a proposal for cell production.
  • Last month, CEO Elon Musk said Tesla found new innovations to bring down the cost of producing batteries while integrating them inside of its cars more efficiently. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Tesla may be planning to build battery cells alongside Cybertrucks and other vehicles at its newest factory, set to open in 2021.

Documents filed with the state’s Commission on Environmental Quality, first reported by the Austin Business Journal, cite battery cell manufacturing among activities to occur at the 2,100-acre site near Austin.

“The facility is proposing to operate a cell-manufacturing unit to produce the battery packs that are installed in the vehicle,” one of the permit applications first spotted by Bloomberg says.

In recent months, Tesla

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Trump’s antibody treatment was tested using cells originally derived from an abortion

This week, President Donald Trump extolled the cutting-edge coronavirus treatments he received as “miracles coming down from God.” If that’s true, then God employs cell lines derived from human fetal tissue.

The emergency antibody that Trump received last week was developed with the use of a cell line originally derived from abortion tissue, according to Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, the company that developed the experimental drug.

The Trump administration has taken an increasingly firm line against medical research using fetal tissue from abortions. For example, when it moved in 2019 to curtail the ability of the National Institutes of Health to fund such research, supporters hailed a “major pro-life victory” and thanked Trump personally for taking decisive action against what they called the “outrageous and disgusting” practice of “experimentation using baby body parts.”

But when the president faced a deadly encounter with covid-19, his administration raised no objections over the fact that

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Preserved Brain Cells Still Visible In Victim Of Ancient Vesuvius Eruption

KEY POINTS

  • A group of scientists discovered brain tissues intact in ancient human remains 
  • Claims in the new study remain open for debate among other experts
  • The finding adds to astounding discoveries related to the historic  Mount Vesuvius eruption

Frozen neurons remain visible in the brain of a victim of the eruption of Mount Vesuvius that took place in 79 A.D. The structure of the brain tissues, including spinal cords, are still intact at present, new research has claimed.

The eruption of Mount Vesuvius is a significant occurrence in the world’s history. The incident covered several Roman cities with thick ashes and molten rock, including Pompeii in Italy. The tragedy would have turned everything in ashes. However, bodies were preserved underneath, like they were frozen in time.

In a new study published in the journal PLOS One, a team of researchers said the neurons and remains of the spinal cords

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New device helps study the reaction of individual cells to mechanical stress

The behavior of cells is controlled by their environment. Besides biological factors or chemical substances, physical forces such as pressure or tension are also involved. Researchers from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and Heidelberg University developed a method that enables them to analyze the influence of external forces on individual cells. Using a 3D printing process, they produced micro-scaffolds, each of which has four pillars on which a cell is located.

Triggered by an external signal, a hydrogel inside the scaffold swells and pushes the pillars apart, so that the cell must “stretch.” The work is part of the “3D Matter Made to Order” (3DMM2O) Cluster of Excellence. The researchers report on their results in Science Advances (DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.abc2648).

Many cellular biological processes, such as wound healing or the development of tissue, are strongly influenced by the properties of their environment. Cells

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Highly efficient perovskite solar cells with enhanced stability and minimised lead leakage

Highly efficient perovskite solar cells with enhanced stability and minimised lead leakage
A researcher tests the function of the solar cells inside the glove box. Credit: City University of Hong Kong

While the power conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cells (PVSCs)—a future of solar cells—has already greatly improved in the past decade, the problems of instability and potential environmental impact are yet to be overcome. Recently, scientists from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) have developed a novel method which can simultaneously tackle the leakage of lead from PVSCs and the stability issue without compromising efficiency, paving the way for real-life application of perovskite photovoltaic technology.


The research team is co-led by Professor Alex Jen Kwan-yue, CityU’s Provost and Chair Professor of Chemistry and Materials Science, together with Professor Xu Zhengtao and Dr. Zhu Zonglong from the Department of Chemistry. Their research findings were recently published in the scientific journal Nature Nanotechnology, titled “2-D metal-organic framework for stable perovskite solar cells

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Cool Technology Allows for Better Views of Cancerous Blood Cells in Quest for New Treatment

Kielkopf-Calvi and cryo-electron microscope

Clara Kielkopf, Ph.D., left, and Laura Calvi, M.D., stand by the University’s new cryo-microscope

With the recent acquisition of Nobel Prize-winning technology and two new grants, Wilmot Cancer Institute researchers are streamlining their investigations into a malignant blood disease known as MDS, working toward discovering targeted therapies.

Laura Calvi, M.D., and Clara Kielkopf, Ph.D., are leading collaborative teams that will be using a device at the University of Rochester Medical Center — a cryo-electron microscope — that has ushered in a new era in biochemistry. The microscope allows scientists to see 3D snapshots and more details of living molecules than ever before, down to near-atomic resolution, to understand disease and uncover new ways to design drugs. The developers of the technology were awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2017.

Calvi and Kielkopf each received Edward P. Evans Foundation awards totaling $1.2 million for this project. Evans grants go to scientists

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Novel technology for the selection of single photosynthetic cells

Novel technology for the selection of single photosynthetic cells
PhenoChip- a microfluidic device for the single cell phenotyping of unicellular phototrophs such as microalgae and cyanobacteria. Credit: Lars Behrendt

You might need a microscope to witness the next agricultural revolution. New research, published in the journal Science Advances, demonstrates how microfluidic technologies can be used to identify, isolate and propagate specific single photosynthetically active cells for fundamental industry applications and improved ecosystem understanding.


Natural environments are inherently dynamic and require photosynthetic organisms to adapt their physiology to make optimal use of available resources and grow to the best of their abilities. However, not all photosynthetic organisms are equally efficient in this physiological fine-tuning, and where some, for example, succumb to the effects of temperature stress, others persist and grow.

In agriculture, humans have taken advantage of this phenotypic heterogeneity in natural plant populations for thousands of years: the selective breeding of more resistant or productive plant phenotypes has

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