Tag: carriers

Staying connected when the world falls apart: How carriers keep networks going

To Mike Muniz, an area manager for AT&T’s network disaster recovery team, witnessing the aftermath of Hurricane Michael was like entering a war zone.

On Oct. 10, 2018, two days after forming over the Caribbean Sea, Hurricane Michael made landfall in the Florida Panhandle. The most powerful hurricane to hit the US since Andrew in 1992, the Category 5 Michael killed 45 people, left 700,000 residents across Florida, Georgia and Alabama without power and caused $25 billion in damage.

Muniz arrived in Mexico Beach, Florida, a couple days later to help restore the area’s cell service, which the storm had wiped out.

“I look back, I think it was worse than Puerto Rico [after Hurricane Maria in 2017],” Muniz says. “I remember seeing people just wandering around.”

Following disasters that topple cellphone towers or knock entire networks offline, wireless providers need to be on top of their game when repairing

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US Carriers Prep 5G Networks For iPhone 12 Launch

Less than a week before the launch of what’s widely expected to be the best-selling 5G phone to date, US telco carriers are in a bit of an interesting dilemma. The problem is that several recent articles in places like PC Magazine and the Washington Post have reported that real-world 5G performance and coverage is significantly worse than many hoped for and expected.

In fact, in several cities around the country, tests showed that 5G performance was actually worse than 4G—certainly not what we were all promised, nor what eager new iPhone 12 owners are going to want. (It is, however, a topic I discussed nearly a year ago in a column called “How Fast Will 5G Really Be?”) In order to better

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Cargo carriers warn that getting a COVID-19 vaccine to everyone on Earth could take up to two years



a large passenger jet sitting on top of a runway: Space on scheduled cargo flights is already filling up through February, with holiday shopping and consumer electronics leading the demand. vaalaa/Shutterstock.com


© vaalaa/Shutterstock.com
Space on scheduled cargo flights is already filling up through February, with holiday shopping and consumer electronics leading the demand. vaalaa/Shutterstock.com

  • Even if a coronavirus vaccine is approved soon, it will likely be years until it can be distributed around the world, according to cargo airline and logistics executives.
  • Challenging storage and shipping requirements, combined with reduced cargo availability and higher demand, are likely to delay distribution, according to a new Wall Street Journal report.
  • Although cargo airlines are trying to prepare, a host of unknowns — including where the vaccine will be made, how many doses are needed, and how it will need to be stored — means there’s only so much that can be organized in advance.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Even if a COVID-19 vaccine can be developed, approved, and mass produced quickly, getting it to countries and communities around the world

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