Tag: carbon

A better carbon trap will take greenhouse gases out of the air and put them to use

A Better Carbon Trap Will Take Greenhouse Gases Out of the Air and Put Them To Use
Credit: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Carbon capture technologies play a critical role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions from power plants and factories, while harnessing carbon dioxide (CO2) for other energy production.


With the support of a grant from the Department of Energy, Miao Yu, the Priti and Mukesh Chatter ’82 Career Development Chair of Chemical and Biological Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, will develop a novel porous material capable of capturing even very small concentrations of CO2 in the air and collecting the gas for further use

This challenge is more nuanced than it may sound. Yu and his team will use amine molecules to trap the CO2, but the bond formed during that chemical reaction must be broken so that the gas can be gathered. And in order to do that, the material has to be heated. The problem, Yu said, is that when the

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Investors urge heavy carbon emitters to set science-based reduction targets

FILE PHOTO: Cracked earth marks a dried-up area near a wind turbine used to generate electricity at a wind farm in Guazhou, 950km (590 miles) northwest of Lanzhou, Gansu Province September 15, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Barria/File Photo

LONDON (Reuters) – Investors managing around $20 trillion in assets on Tuesday called on the heaviest corporate emitters of greenhouse gases to set science-based targets on the way to net zero carbon emissions by mid-century.

AXA Group and Nikko Asset Management Co are among 137 investors urging 1,800 companies responsible for a quarter of global emissions to act, coordinated by non-profit group CDP.

While more companies are pledging their support for the 2015 Paris agreement on climate change, aiming to be carbon neutral by 2050, not all have been clear about how they will get there.

To help limit global warming to no more than 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial norms by 2050, companies

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Carbon tech, plastics recycling could slash greenhouse gas emissions in Houston

Oil and gas carbon capture technology and plastics recycling facilities could reduce industrial emissions of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, by 44 percent in the Houston region, according to a new emissions analysis.



a factory under a cloudy sky: Shell Deer Park Refinery on Thursday, March 29, 2018, in Deer Park, Texas.


© Elizabeth Conley, Chronicle / Houston Chronicle

Shell Deer Park Refinery on Thursday, March 29, 2018, in Deer Park, Texas.


The report, produced by the University of Houston and the Center for Houston’s Future, a local think tank, found that technology used in the oil and gas sector to capture, use and store carbon dioxide, combined with advanced plastics recycling, could reduce the global warming emissions in Houston’s industrial sector by 22 million metric tons per year.

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Houston’s industrial sector currently produces about 50 million metric tons of carbon dioxide per year.

Existing oil and gas facilities and technology could allow the Houston region to demonstrate large-scale carbon management technology, experts found — feasibly taking

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ADVA sets ambitious new targets to radically reduce carbon emissions


ADVA (FSE: ADV) today announced that its stringent targets to reduce greenhouse gas emissions have been approved by the Science Based Targets Initiative (SBTi). The new commitment is aligned with the most ambitious goals of the Paris climate accord: limiting global temperature increase to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels. ADVA, which was one of the first telecommunication technology suppliers to have targets validated by SBTi, is now committed to a 67% cut in emissions from its own operations by 2032. The new goals are part of a holistic sustainability strategy alongside radical improvements to the energy efficiency of ADVA’s complete product line. The targets are also a major step towards ADVA’s own production processes becoming carbon neutral.


“This new pledge puts us in line with the most aggressive internationally agreed targets for tackling greenhouse gasses. By shrinking our operations emissions by 67%, we’re helping to keep global warming below

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New study reveals sheep and beef farms close to being carbon neutral



a group of sheep standing on top of a lush green field: The study found on average around 90 percent of emissions are being absorbed.


© Getty
The study found on average around 90 percent of emissions are being absorbed.

A new study shows New Zealand sheep and beef farms are already offsetting the bulk of their agricultural emissions.

The research – led by Dr Bradley Case at Auckland University of Technology (AUT) – estimates the woody vegetation on sheep and beef farms across the country is offsetting between 63 percent and 118 percent of on-farm agricultural emissions.

If the mid-point of that range is taken, on average around 90 percent of emissions are being absorbed.

Dr Case, who is a senior lecturer in GIS and remote sensing at AUT’s Applied Ecology Department in the School of Science, said the findings showed there was a strong case for farmers to get credit for the sequestration already happening on their farms.

“This is an integral part of He Waka

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Who’s driving whom? Climate and carbon cycle in perpetual interaction

Who is driving whom? Climate and carbon cycle in perpetual interaction
The research vessel JOIDES Resolution in Fremantle (Australia) the morning before the ship sailed on Expedition 356. The results are based on samples taken from this drilling vessel as part of the International Ocean Discovery Program IODP. Credit: William Crawford, IODP JRSO

Man-made global heating has long been presented as a relatively simple chain of cause and effect: humans disrupt the carbon cycle by burning fossil fuels, thereby increase the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere, which in turn leads to higher temperatures around the globe. “However, it becomes increasingly clear that this is not the end of the story. Forest fires become more frequent all over the world, release additional CO2 into the atmosphere, and further reinforce the global warming that enhanced forest fire risk in the first place. This is a textbook example of what climate scientists call a positive feedback mechanism,” stresses David De Vleeschouwer,

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PhosAgro Warns of Billions in Losses from EU Carbon Tax

(Bloomberg) — PhosAgro PJSC, Russia’s biggest producer of phosphate fertilizer, is calling for the government to help mitigate potentially billions in losses for the country’s raw-materials producers if Europe introduces a carbon tax.



a close up of a snow covered mountain: Granules of monoammonium phosphate (MAP) sit inside a storage warehouse at the PhosAgro-Cherepovets fertilizer plant, operated by PhosAgro PJSC, in Cherepovets, Russia, on Wednesday, Aug. 9, 2017. Phosphate fertilizer prices may be supported in the 2H by "high season in India, pre-winter buying activity in the Northern hemisphere and risks of further potential production cuts in China," PhosAgro chief executive officer Andrey Guryev said in a statement.


© Bloomberg
Granules of monoammonium phosphate (MAP) sit inside a storage warehouse at the PhosAgro-Cherepovets fertilizer plant, operated by PhosAgro PJSC, in Cherepovets, Russia, on Wednesday, Aug. 9, 2017. Phosphate fertilizer prices may be supported in the 2H by “high season in India, pre-winter buying activity in the Northern hemisphere and risks of further potential production cuts in China,” PhosAgro chief executive officer Andrey Guryev said in a statement.

The European Union is looking at how a potential carbon tax could help meet its 2050 goal of climate neutrality. If imposed, the levy would hit imports, including raw materials and products produced in countries without duties on emissions, such as Russia. The European Commission, the bloc’s executive

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As atmospheric carbon rises, so do rivers, adding to flooding

flood
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

When it comes to climate change, relationships are everything. That’s a key takeaway of a new UO study that examines the interaction between plants, atmospheric carbon dioxide and rising water levels in the Mississippi River.


Published recently in the Geological Society of America’s journal GSA Today, the study compared historical atmospheric carbon data against observations of herbarium leaf specimens to quantify the relationship between rising carbon levels and increasingly catastrophic floods in the American Midwest.

Using data covering more than two centuries, researchers demonstrated that as carbon levels in the atmosphere have risen due to the burning of fossil fuels, the ability of plants to absorb water from the air has decreased. That means more rainfall makes its way into rivers and streams, adding to their potential for damaging floods.

Co-authored by UO Museum of Natural and Cultural History geologist Greg Retallack and earth sciences

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Lidar study suggests carbon storage losses greater than thought in Amazon due to losses at edge of forests

LiDAR study suggests carbon storage losses greater than thought in Amazon due to losses at edge of forests
Graphic summary of the main results found in the work. Credit: Celso H. L. Silva Junior

An international team of researchers has found that carbon sequestering losses in the Amazon basin have been undermeasured due to omission of data representing losses at the edges of forests. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes using lidar to estimate the carbon sequestering abilities of trees along the edges of Amazon forests.


Prior research has shown that when part of a forest in the Amazon basin is cut down, the trees that remain at the edges of the forest are not as robust as those that are situated farther in. This is because they are more exposed to pollution, pesticides, herbicides, etc. In this new effort, the researchers noticed that the reduced sequestering abilities of such trees are not included in studies of carbon sequestering losses in

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Edmonton non-profit funds forest creation for natural carbon capture in Alberta

Project Forest planting crew

Treetime Services planting crew work to reforest a pipeline right of way in Northeast Alberta near Lac La Biche. Photo credit: Supplied by Project Forest
Treetime Services planting crew work to reforest a pipeline right of way in Northeast Alberta near Lac La Biche. Photo credit: Supplied by Project Forest
Treetime Services planting crew work to reforest a pipeline right of way in Northeast Alberta near Lac La Biche. Photo credit: Supplied by Project Forest

EDMONTON, Oct. 01, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — It’s been proven that forests capture carbon naturally—they literally suck. And one Alberta non-profit, run by a team of passionate silviculturists, wants to harness that power for good by creating opportunities to rewild local landscapes close to home. 

“Forests are arguably the most cost-effective means of capturing atmospheric carbon,” says Mike Toffan, General Manager of Reclamation and Forestry for Tree Time Services and founder of Project Forest. “They clean the air and water, support animal habitat and provide us with a natural playground.”

While there are a number of

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