Tag: candidates

If Google Had To Sell Chrome, Who Would Buy It? Here Are 5 Candidates

There are grim times ahead for big tech. Democrats are pushing for Congress to rein in firms such as Google, Apple and Facebook, while the EU has reportedly drawn up a list of 20 internet companies that will be subject to stringent new rules that curb their power.

At the weekend, Politico reported that the Justice Department and state prosecutors, who are investigating Google for alleged antitrust violations, are considering whether to force Google to sell its Chrome browser.

Chrome is by far the world’s most used browser, with almost 70% of the market on desktop computers and 64% on mobile, according to NetMarketShare.

If Google were forced to cleave its browser away from its advertising business, who would buy it? Here are some of the likely contenders:

Samsung

Samsung certainly has the funds to make big buys

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State senate candidates: Career and technical education key to environmental, economic success

BRUNSWICK — Supporting career and technical education programs for young people could go a long way toward ensuring a future for Maine that is both economically and environmentally sustainable, according to four candidates vying to represent the Midcoast in the Maine Senate Districts 23 and 24.

Sen. Eloise Vitelli, the Democrat incumbent, and Holly Kopp, a Republican, are running to represent District 23, which encompasses Sagadahoc County and Dresden. Rep Mattie Daughtry, a Democrat, will face Republican Brad Pattershall for the seat representing District 24, which includes Brunswick, Freeport, Harpswell, North Yarmouth and Pownal. 

The four candidates participated in a virtual forum hosted by the Southern Midcoast Chamber of Commerce on Friday. 

Vitelli, Kopp, Daughtry and Pattershall all expressed staunch support for making Region 10 Technical High School, the area’s vocational and technical school, a full-fledged, four-year comprehensive technical high school where students learn career and technical subjects alongside their

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Twitter tightens limits on candidates ahead of US election

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Twitter is imposing tough new rules that restrict candidates from declaring premature victory and tighten its measures against spreading misinformation, calling for political violence and spreading thoughtless commentary in the days leading up to and following the Nov. 3 U.S. election.

The social platform will remove tweets that encourage violence or call for people to interfere with election results. Tweets that falsely claim a candidate has won will be labeled to direct users to the official U.S. election results page on Twitter.

Twitter said Friday it is will also make it more difficult to retweet posts it has labeled to highlight the presence of misleading information — whether about COVID, civic integrity or for including manipulated photos or videos. Beginning next week, people who want to retweet such posts will see a prompt pointing them to credible information about the topic before they are able to

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The Technology 202: Silicon Valley is preparing for candidates to falsely declare victory on Election Night

Google says it will prioritize election results from the Associated Press and Democracy Works, a nonpartisan nonprofit organization that provides information on how to vote, according to company executives. Searches won’t show news reports that prematurely declare victory for a certain candidate, and if any misinformation does slip through, Google says it will be ready to take it down. “We do have a plan,” Google’s vice president of engineering, Cathy Edwards, said on Thursday.

Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg said if any campaign tries to declare victory before they should, the company will add a label directing people to “the official results.” He said the platform is partnering with Reuters and the National Election Pool to provide authoritative information.

The tech industry wants to appear ready for post-election chaos. But it doesn’t have a great track record. 

Many Americans will be voting by mail because of the coronavirus pandemic, and

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