Tag: Brazil

B&W Environmental to Supply Highly Efficient Cooling Technology for Pulp Mill in Brazil

Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) (NYSE: BW) announced today that its B&W Environmental segment will design and supply its highly efficient SPIG S.p.A. cooling towers for a pulp mill operated by LD Celulose S.A. in the Triângulo Mineiro region in Brazil. The contract is valued at approximately $2 million.

LD Celulose S.A. is a joint venture between the Austria-based Lenzing Group and the Brazil-based Duratex. The plant will produce 500,000 tons of soluble cellulose annually.

“B&W Environmental’s specialized SPIG cooling solutions can be tailored for the needs of the pulp & paper industry and for soluble cellulose production,” said SPIG Managing Director Alberto Galantini. “We see a growing market for our services in South America, especially in Brazil.”

“For this project, we will provide SPIG cooling tower cells with concrete structures, engineered to meet our customer’s specifications,” Galantini said. “We thank LD Celulose for this opportunity and look forward to a

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Brazil moves toward transfer of deforestation and fire monitoring to military

  • In a recent announcement, Brazilian Vice President Hamilton Mourão defended the creation of a new agency that would have full authority over Amazon deforestation and fire monitoring satellite alerts. For three decades, INPE, Brazil’s civilian space agency, has held that role, making data publicly available.
  • The VP claims INPE satellite monitoring is outdated and doesn’t see through clouds. Critics of the government note that the space institute’s Prodes and Deter systems continue to provide excellent data on Amazon fires and deforestation, usable for enforcement, while clouds matter little in the dry season when most fires occur.
  • Critics contend that multiple moves by the government to disempower INPE are likely ways of denying transparency, ending INPE’s civil authority, and placing deforestation and fire monitoring satellites under secretive military control.
  • So far, an effort to fund new military satellites has failed. Meanwhile, Norway has partnered with the companies Planet and Airbus to
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A city in Brazil where covid-19 ran amok may be a ‘sentinel’ for the rest of the world

What happens when a major city allows the coronavirus to rage unchecked?

If the Brazilian city of Manaus is any answer, it means about two-thirds of the population could get infected and one person in 500 could die before the epidemic winds down.

During May, as the virus spread rapidly in Manaus, the equatorial capital of the state of Amazonas, dire reports described overwhelmed hospitals and freshly dug graves. Demand for coffins ran at four to five times figures for the previous year. But since hitting a peak four months ago, new coronavirus cases and deaths in the city of 1.8 million have undergone a rapid and unexplained decline.

Now a group of researchers from Brazil and the United Kingdom say they know why—so many people got infected that the virus is running out of hosts.

In a report posted to the preprint server medRxiv, a group led by Ester

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Podcast: COVID-19 is helping turn Brazil into a surveillance state

Leading discussions about the global rules to regulate digital privacy and surveillance is a somewhat unusual role for a developing country to play. But Brazil had been doing just that for over a decade.

Edward Snowden’s bombshell in 2014 detailing the US National Security Agency’s digital surveillance activities changed all that. It included revelations that the agency had been spying on Brazil’s state-controlled oil company Petrobras, and even on then-president Dilma Rousseff´s communications. The leaks prompted the Brazilian government to adopt a kind of digital “Bill of Rights” for its citizens, and lawmakers would go on to pass a data protection measure closely modeled on Europe’s GDPR. 

But the country has now shifted toward a more authoritarian path. Last October, President Jair Bolsonaro signed a decree compelling all federal bodies to share the vast troves of data they hold on Brazilian citizens and consolidate it in a centralized database, the

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Brazil Pantanal Scorched by Fires

PORTO JOFRE, Brazil — A record amount of the world’s largest tropical wetland has been lost to the fires sweeping Brazil this year, scientists said, devastating a delicate ecosystem that is one of the most biologically diverse habitats on the planet.

The enormous fires — often set by ranchers and farmers to clear land, but exacerbated by unusually dry conditions in recent weeks — have engulfed more than 10 percent of the Brazilian wetlands, known as the Pantanal, exacting a toll scientists call “unprecedented.”

The fires in the Pantanal, in southwest Brazil, raged across an estimated 7,861 square miles between January and August, according to an analysis conducted by NASA for The New York Times, based on a new system to track fires in real time using satellite data. That’s an area slightly larger than New Jersey.

The previous record was in 2005, when approximately 4,608 square miles burned in

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