Category: LATEST SCIENCE NEWS

Space Force, DoD agencies, NRO try to get on the same page on future acquisitions

A “program integration council” run by the Space and Missile Systems Center will include representatives from DoD space-buying agencies and the National Reconnaissance Office.

WASHINGTON — The Space Force announced in June that one of its major field organizations will be an acquisition command that will unify the current mishmash of agencies that handle space programs.

The new organization, the Space Systems Command, has not yet been stood up. In the meantime, representatives from several space buying agencies will be meeting regularly in an informal “program integration council” led by the Space Force’s Space and Missile Systems Center.

“We want to make sure that there’s alignment across programs,” Col. Dennis Bythewood, the Space and Missile Systems Center’s director of special programs, told SpaceNews in an interview.

The integration council is run by the Space and Missile Systems Center. It includes representatives from agencies that operate independently from the Space Force

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Australia Says Majority of 470-Strong Beached Whale Pod Has Died | World News

SYDNEY (Reuters) – The majority of a 470-strong pod of pilot whales found stranded off Australia’s remote southern coast has died, officials said on Wednesday, as rescuers struggled in freezing waters and fading light to free those still alive.

The group, which is the biggest beaching in the country’s modern history, were first spotted a wide sandbank during an aerial reconnaissance of rugged Macquarie Harbour in Tasmania state on Monday.

After two days of a difficult and dangerous rescue attempt, state marine scientists said at least 380 of the long-finned pilot whales had died.

By late Wednesday, around fifty of the mammals were freed but experts said there was a high likelihood they would return as many did during the rescue attempt a day earlier, creating an exhausting loop for rescuers who cannot work through the night.

The outlook for the remaining 30 stranded and still alive pilot whales, a

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Whale beaching: An enduring mystery

By Paulina Duran

SYDNEY (Reuters) – Rescuers are trying to free a pod of long-finned pilot whales stranded off the Australian island of Tasmania. Around 470 whales are in the pod, more than half of which have already died, in one of the world’s biggest beachings.

WHY DO WHALES BEACH THEMSELVES?

It’s the question that has puzzled marine biologists for years, and continues to do so. Mass whale strandings have occurred throughout recorded modern history, and likely earlier.

“Strandings around the world are complete mysteries,” said Vanessa Pirotta, a Sydney-based wildlife scientist.

While scientists don’t know the exact reason, they do know that whales – and dolphins, which are also prone to mass beaching – are very sociable animals. They travel together in pods, often following a leader, and are known to gather around injured or distressed whales.

“There are many different factors that can cause a stranding,” said Australian

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What could a space telescope just for solar system science do?

To date, planetary scientists have built spacecraft and astrophysicists have built space telescopes. But the time has come to change that, some solar system researchers say.



a close up of a light: An artist's depiction of the solar system and the spacecraft that have left Earth to explore it over the years.


© Provided by Space
An artist’s depiction of the solar system and the spacecraft that have left Earth to explore it over the years.

Astrophysics space telescopes, particularly the venerable Hubble Space Telescope, have been vital tools for science right here in our solar system and far beyond. But there’s only so much science you can do with a borrowed telescope, planetary scientists find, particularly with one as in-demand Hubble, for instance.

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“We really haven’t had a dedicated solar system space telescope, we have relied on astrophysics assets — which are great, they’ve made critical contributions to solar system science,” Amanda Hendrix, a planetary scientist at the Planetary Science Institute, said during a virtual meeting of the Outer Planets Advisory Group held

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ABP Publishing, a European Market Leader Audiobook Publisher, Rose Superior to Coronacrisis and Increased Sales 65%

Despite the necessity to change the company routine, the publishing house managed to increase performance twice during the lockdown.

ABP Publishing shares the results of the second quarter. They show a significant rise in popularity and interest to audiobooks.

Based on the financial reports for the second quarter, the sales increased 65% compared with the same period of the previous year. The most impressive results have been achieved in the French market with doubled sales.

Noteworthy, during the quarantine, the structure of the listeners’ interests has changed. For instance, the audiobooks in the category Relationships and parenting were bought by 50% more often than before the lockdown. The listeners who had to spend more time with their families were searching for ways of comfortable and mutually respected communication with their significant others. As judged by reviews, ABP Publishing audiobooks were immensely helpful in such an unusual situation.

Speaking of listeners’

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Recommendations for navigating ethical dilemmas in studying global societies

Recommendations for navigating ethical dilemmas in studying global societies
Md. Sadiquzzaman, a long-time employee of ICDDR,B and field assistant with the Shodagor Longitudinal Health and Demography Project, collecting whole capillary blood via finger prick from a Shodagor woman and her son. Blood from finger pricks was used to conduct point-of-care tests that would determine risk of diabetes and anemia. Collection of biomedical data, as part of the larger project, was motivated by requests from members of the Shodagor community to gain more knowledge about their health status and, especially, the health status of their children. Credit: Kathrine Starkweather

A group of social scientists who conduct cross-cultural research are casting a critical lens on their own practices.


While this is by no means the first time that such self-reflection has been undertaken, the analysis, published in the Sept. 23 issue of Proceedings of the Royal Society B, is particularly timely given the growing appetite for including diverse populations in

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The Disruption Of The Consulting Industry Is Here

CEO and Managing Partner at Infosys Consulting, a leading business and technology consultancy.

With the world of work having experienced massive disruption over the past several months, a return to normalcy has slowly begun. However, in my view, the new normal ahead is yet to be fully defined, but it’s destined to look much different as companies and employees navigate unchartered territory. This unknown working model also includes us as consultancies and advisors — those who have been challenged as an industry to keep work going virtually without the in-person environment we have anchored much of our existence to.

The consulting space has long been an industry with a heavy reliance on large in-person teams traveling to client locations every week. It’s also been critical for us for networking with client stakeholders and building strong personal relationships. On any given Monday morning, you can bet every third seat

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Generational shifts help migratory bats keep pace with global warming

Generational shifts help migratory bats keep pace with global warming
Common noctule bat. Credit: Anton Vlaschenko

Many animal species are currently changing their distribution range owing to global warming. The underlying mechanisms are still little known, especially in mammals.


An international team of scientists led by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) has now demonstrated that in the common noctule bat, one of the largest European bat species, the colonization of hibernacula progresses from lower to higher latitudes over successive generations of young animals—especially first-year males. Because of their relatively high reproduction rate and the long-distance dispersal of male juveniles, it is probably relatively easy for common noctules to adjust to global warming. For species with lower reproduction rates and a limited migratory potential of the young—the majority of European bat species—the future might not look as favorable when facing continuing global warming. The paper was published in the scientific journal Biology Letters.

The rapid pace

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Watch live: NASA chief to lay out budget needs to send astronauts to moon

Sept. 23 (UPI) — Congress will hear testimony Wednesday from NASA about its budget needs as the space agency has stated it requires full funding to carry out plans to send astronauts to the moon by 2024.

NASA Administrator James F. Bridenstine will appear before a Senate appropriations subcommittee to discuss the agency’s fiscal 2021 budget.

The hearing is scheduled to begin at 2 p.m. EDT and will be streamed live here.

NASA said in a report Monday it needs $28 billion for the first phase of its Artemis lunar program through fiscal 2025.

That figure includes $16.2 billion to develop, test and launch new-generation moon lander vehicles that will carry astronauts to the surface of the moon, as well as $7.6 billion for Boeing Space Launch System rockets, ground systems and Lockheed Martin Orion crew capsules.

The Senate has yet to pass a bill to fund NASA and an

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Sounds made by fluttering feathers help fork-tailed flycatchers communicate

Sept. 22 (UPI) — Scientists have added another species to the list of birds that use sounds made with their feathers to communicate.

The male fork-tailed flycatcher, a passerine bird species native to the American tropics, creates unique sounds by fluttering its feathers at high frequencies, according to research published Wednesday in the journal Integrative and Comparative Biology.

“Back in the 1960’s, scientists noticed that they produce a distinctive sound only during a particular flight display,” researcher Christopher Clark, told UPI in an email.

“And those species of flycatcher in the genus Tyrannus, those that make the most distinctive sounds have the most distinctly shaped outer primary feathers,” said Clark, an associate professor of evolutionary biology at the University of California Riverside.

For the latest research, scientists conducted field studies to better understand both the mechanics of the feather fluttering and its communicative utility.

“We found that the birds

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